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Adding Tile GPS Key Finders on Metal Detecting Equipment

Somewhere in Jessamine County, Kentucky, there lies a Garrett Pinpointer.  Lost in 2012, it is surely ruined now by snow, rain and ice.  And perhaps was eaten or smashed by a cow.  Or something.  At $120 a pop, these things are not cheap – and losing something like this can disrupt our precious detecting time.

Metal Detectorists – What Does “Saving History” Mean to You?

I’ve been a digger for over 30 years and am proud to consider many of you friends I’d be privileged to metal detect with.  I’m not “in the pocket” of the Archaeologists, but I have learned a lot about it in the past 5 years or so and find myself in between two sets of beliefs

Social Media and Archaeology – Presentation at MSU Digital Archaeology Event

Excellent new presentation from Terry Brock (Montpelier Foundation) and Lynne Goldstein of MSU on use of Social Media by Archaeologists presented at the Institute on Digital Archaeology Method & Practice at MSU August 17-22, 2015. Social Media and Archaeology: Where Does it Fit and Why Should We Participate? from Terry Brock Here’s the video stream, but

Why I Always Ask Metal Detecting Permission in Person

When we ask permission to access private property, what impacts whether people will say yes or no?  We must understand the motivations and habits of information consumers.   So I read a lot of research like this about how people behave.  When it crossed my desk recently and I immediately thought about how it applies directly to

Grand Army of the Republic Button

Found, at an early 1800s site, a Grand Army of the Republic Button.  It’s in poor condition and thus shows how mportant it is to get these artifacts out of the ground. At least this was rescued before it dissolved completely.  “The Grand Army of the Republic was founded in 1866 by Benjamin F. Stephe nson

Guest Post: Dick Stout responds to my “Who’s to blame” post.

Dick intended this to be a response to my post but the comment system I was trying blocked him.  So I’m posting it here from his site in its entirety. Scott’s blog “Who’s to blame” is on the money, and a topic that always gets my attention. I guess that’s because his comments align with

Who’s to blame for continued metal detecting bans on public lands?

As the independent detector shop dwindles in the era of e-commerce, we have lost a critical link in the education of hobbyists on the ethical use of detectors.  They used to be the front-line:  Getting permission, filling holes, writing your congressman… these were all responsibilities of our hobby – and you were taught in many